Blog Archives - Page 3 of 27 - Sender One Climbing
Moms Who Crush

Moms Who Crush

We'd like to wish all the incredible moms a Happy Mother's Day! Thank you for being supportive, hardworking, understanding, and loving. We know it's not easy! Moms, you inspire us all and we appreciate you every day.

We took a moment to connect with some moms who are members of our community. Take a look at how they manage parenting and climbing in their own unique ways.

Happy Mother's Day!

Jessica Christensen

Sender One Member Since 2014

How do you balance motherhood and climbing?
I guess I don’t always see it as a balance since I’ve kind of gotten used to having Miles around. It just is. At first, it took a major lowering of expectations. If we (Erik, Miles, and I) could get out for a day, it was a success even if we only got a couple of routes in. It helps that I am pretty stuck on sport climbing. Trad is another story, actually, a funny but kind of sad one involving Miles. [We] would leave him at the base of Cyclops without realizing he only had a little battery left in his iPad. He was more than a little distraught when we re-emerged from the downclimb. Honestly, more battery and he would have never even noticed.

What is the biggest challenge of being a climbing mom?
The biggest challenge is really trying not to eat all of the rad snacks a 7-year-old’s metabolism can afford to eat.

Do your kids climb? If so, how do you get them excited about climbing?
Miles likes to camp, hike, and scramble and that’s all I care about. He participates in Mighty Monkeys but he likes and is most adept at pretty much any sport. We never push him to climb (or we try really hard not to). Ultimately, I'm good with whatever sport he chooses but it sure works out for him to like what I like for now at least.

 

What is your favorite thing about being a climbing mom?
Eating his snacks after I climb.

What kind of system do you and your climbing partner have in place when you are out climbing with the kids?
iPad with charge and downloads. We always saved that for the gym or when we are climbing. I know it isn’t an ideal babysitter but it keeps him in one place. Again, it’s also realistic expectations and sport or bouldering (ha) only. He is getting old enough to clean between us so we are trying to get him to set a goal, possibly Cyclops since we goofed on the aforementioned incident.

Do you have any advice for expecting and other climbing moms?
It’s your kid, if you are an okay to great person, then they will be too. Understand that the time with a little kid is so rad and weird and awesome and awful all at the same time and be patient, with them and yourselves. And also, charge the iPad, never plan on wifi, and pack snacks. And whiskey.

Amy Hoffman

Sender One Member Since 2015

How do you balance motherhood and climbing?
I started climbing after my kids did, so this part is easy for me: I climb during my kids’ climbing team practice most of the time, and sometimes meet a friend for my own session on the weekends. As I have grown to love the sport for myself, not just as a mom of kids who climb, I started to set goals for myself and challenge myself to improve, so I try to use my time at the gym well.

What is the biggest challenge of being a climbing mom?
The biggest challenge for me is worry over injuries. Indoor climbing is a safe sport for the most part, but my kids have had several injuries, from mild to fairly serious. After the serious climbing injury my teenaged daughter experienced, I had a really hard time coming back to climbing myself: I had a lot of anxiety and had to really work through that mentally and emotionally in order to get back to a place where I felt joy when climbing again. Seeing her come back even stronger has been such an inspiration to me, so that helped, too!

 

Do your kids climb? If so, how do you get them excited about climbing?
They do climb...they are both totally hooked on it and are youth competition climbers. There have been periods of time where they hit a plateau or felt less into it, but we just let them take a break if needed or chill out a bit on training, maybe do some outdoor bouldering to shake up the routine, and they have always come back.

What is your favorite thing about being a climbing mom?
I just love the sport and the climbing community. Taking that couple of hours on a weekday to climb hard with friends, just being myself for a minute and not in my mom role, challenging myself, and being totally in the moment on a route...it’s priceless. And of course, it’s wonderful to be able to understand and appreciate what my kids and their friends do as competition climbers; they are amazing!

What kind of system do you and your climbing partner have in place when you are out climbing with the kids?
There are several families that we go outdoors with, mostly bouldering; in general, we just try to make sure we follow good outdoor practices like “leave no trace” and that we are respectful of the parks and crags. Most of the kids are teens or tweens, so they have learned how to be responsible and safe, and we just really enjoy the fresh air and fun times together. Also, we bring lots of snacks, bug spray, sunscreen, and water.

Do you have any advice for expecting and other climbing moms?
I started climbing when my youngest was about 6 years old (he’s 12 now), and I really didn’t think I could do it. I thought I was too out of shape and overweight. Another climbing mom talked me into trying it, and honestly, that was probably one of the best things that have happened to me in my life (thank you, Stephanie!!). My mental and physical health improved so much and I’ve made some wonderful friends. So, my advice would be for the moms whose kids climb, but think they could never do it: try it! You just might fall in love with it like I did.

Jane Chin

Sender One
Member Since 2018

How do you balance motherhood and climbing?
Fortunately, my kid is in a Sender One youth program, so we are both able to climb around the same time! What I appreciate about the youth program is that the coaches are all "on top of things". This means I can trust that my kid's learning skills and getting a good workout, and I can focus on climbing (with my husband). Sometimes "balancing" means having the right "helpers" and "systems" in place for parents, which our family has found with Sender One youth programs.

What is the biggest challenge of being a climbing mom?
My biggest challenge is that I want to use climbing as a way to "get out of my head", but I end up putting too many things "back in my head", such as, "Shouldn't I be climbing harder problems? Why does everything on the Torch feel so scary to me?"... type of self-talk. Then we have the typical "mature climber" problems like risks of injuries and listening to my body's needs to recover with my mind's screaming wants to climb more.

 

Do your kids climb? If so, how do you get them excited about climbing?
My 13-year old has been climbing for a few years, and he is tremendously motivated by his SenderOne teammates and coaches. He looks forward to each climbing session and has become the one who shepherds us to "get climbing stuff ready" so we can arrive on time for his training sessions. I aspire to notice and praise my son's efforts, versus achievements. Sometimes I use climbing as illustrative examples about fear, failing, and working on things within our control.

What is your favorite thing about being a climbing mom?
Climbing is the only sport/fitness activity that I've stuck with this many years (I started climbing in 2014, in my early 40s). I continually learn new skills and tackle new challenges. I enjoy meeting and chatting with people at the gym. Since my husband also climbs, we are spending many hours of the week literally "holding each other's safety" in our hands -- talk about "extreme couples bonding" time! Climbing is such a huge part of my life because we can climb as a family. As an introvert, the climbing community offers me good enough doses of "social time".

What kind of system do you and your climbing partner have in place when you are out climbing with the kids?
Since our kid is older, we will take turns belaying our son on his rope projects. When our son was younger, we'd make sure he'd have activities to keep himself busy in-between climbs -- whether this is a book or a sketch pad or pieces of paper for origami projects. We'd also look for other peers with whom our son may enjoy climbing with since climbing can be a highly social activity.

Do you have any advice for expecting and other climbing moms?
I'd say listen to your body and to others who are supportive of your climbing goals or efforts. I remind myself that I want to climb for as long as my body allows, and this keeps me balanced in terms of pushing myself and taking rest days from climbing or "easy-going" days at the gym. Definitely focus on the antagonistic muscles that keep your overall body balanced and strong: I've had to learn this the hard way!

Michelle Law

Sender One
Member Since 2018

How do you balance motherhood and climbing?
Climbing is usually a family activity at our house. We try to involve our kids in climbing so it doesn't necessarily need to be an "either/or" relationship to balance motherhood and climbing for me. Otherwise, we're lucky enough that we have a large support system of aunties/uncles and other climbing family friends who can help watch the kids so we can climb.

What is the biggest challenge of being a climbing mom?
The biggest challenge for me is trying to find the time to climb - whether it be ducking out to do a climbing date with a friend while someone watches the kids or taking the whole family to the gym (while working around our 3 yr old's nap schedule) and finding time to squeeze in a climb in between trying to belay our kids so they can climb and then keeping them safe and occupied at the gym so we (my husband and I) can climb. The iPad is a popular choice for us and our kids since it keeps them stationary and not running around the gym. If we can get 3-4 climbs per adult during a visit to the gym with the family, we consider it a wild success.

 

Do your kids climb? If so, how do you get them excited about climbing?
We have a 7-yr old and a 3-yr old and they both like to climb (the 7-yr old has been climbing since she was 3). We want them to be excited about climbing without it feeling like a compulsory activity so we'll try to encourage and cheer them on as they climb but when they say they want to stop, we don't push them (for now). Usually seeing us, our friends, or even their friends climb makes them want to try (in our case, throwing in a couple of YouTube videos of Ashima climbing also motivated my daughter as well). My daughter is competitive and likes trying new things so she'll get excited to try harder climbs to try to "one-up" mom by doing the same difficulty as me. Recently, I've been pleasantly surprised to see her trying to boulder as well in the gym. With my 3-year-old, I just want him to feel comfortable and safe in the harness, and hopefully seeing his sister climb might motivate him to try to climb higher. 

What is your favorite thing about being a climbing mom?
I love that this is one of the few "shared" activities that everyone in the family can participate in and enjoy without real age limits. I like how it helps teach me and my kids how to focus and problem solve at the same time as you climb up a route and that it's a good physical activity for me and my kids. 

What kind of system do you and your climbing partner have in place when you are out climbing with the kids?
We try to coordinate with other climbing families and our own families/friends to climb at the same time so that one adult can supervise the kids at a time and give the other adults a chance to climb/belay. We also try to bring activities for our kids (books to read, coloring books...etc) to keep them busy and as a last resort, we always have our trusty old iPad + Netflix to keep them occupied. Also, snacks and drinks are key since we tend to stay for a couple of hours and they will inevitably get hungry.

Do you have any advice for expecting and other climbing moms?
I've found the Sender One community and the families that frequent the gym to be overwhelmingly friendly and kind when it comes to climbing with or without your kids. Don't be afraid to make new friends and acquaintances at the gym or introduce some of your friends and family to the climbing sport so you have a bigger climbing network to call upon to do a group family date at the gym. 

Mental Health Awareness Month: Read All About It

Mental Health Awareness Month: Read All About It

The month of May focuses on Mental Health Awareness. Follow our blogs this month as we share topics on mental health!

As a climbing gym, Sender One fosters physical health and wellness on a daily basis, but we also understand that as a whole, “there is no health without mental health,” as the World Health Organization states. 

Mental Health Awareness Month is about breaking the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental illness so that we can focus on treatments and resolutions for a stronger and happier life. Check out this list of books that dive into different perspectives of those experiencing mental health issues while providing guidance and insight on improving our own mental health. 

If you are struggling with balancing your mental health, we encourage you to speak with a mental health professional. 

INSPIRING READS

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone

Lori Gottlieb

“Rarely have I read a book that challenged me to see myself in an entirely new light, and was at the same time laugh-out-loud funny and utterly absorbing.” - Katie Couric

The Noonday Demon

Andrew Solomon

“Depression is a country that the undepressed can’t enter, but Solomon… bends all his energy and talent as a writer to sending us snapshots from this terrifying land.” - Nicci Gerrard, The Observer

Untamed

Glennon Doyle

“Doyle might just be the patron saint of female empowerment. . . . Here she inspires other women to listen to their intuition and break free of what cages them. . . . Her memoir has a message as clear as a ‘go’ signal: Find and honor your truest self.”- People (Book of the Week)

SELF-HELP

Daring Greatly

Brené Brown

“What I find remarkable about this book is the unique combination of solid research and kitchen table story-telling. Brené becomes such a real person in the book that you can actually hear her voice asking, “Have you dared greatly today?” The invitation in this book is clear: We must be larger than anxiety, fear, and shame if we want to speak, act, and show up. The world needs this book and Brené’s unique blend of warmth, humor and ass-kicking makes her the perfect person to inspire us to dare greatly.” - Harriet Lerner, Ph.D.

Emotional First Aid

Guy Winch

“The advice Winch offers in this refreshingly useful book is both practical and practicable—down-to-earth techniques that really can bring relief when things feel like they’re falling apart.” - Anneli Rufus, author of The Big Book of Low Self-Esteem

The Courage to be Disliked

Ichiro Kishimi and Fumitake Koga

“[The Courage to be Disliked guides] readers toward achieving happiness and lasting change… For those seeking a discourse that helps explain who they are in the world, Kishimi and Koga provide an illuminating conversation.” - Library Journal

YOUNG ADULT

How it Feels to Float

Helena Fox

“A perfect, surreal exploration of mental illness and grief. Fox’s writing is poetry, bringing the reader to the brink of Biz’s madness and back again as she finds new ways to make meaning, and new people to make it with. . . . How It Feels to Float is a visceral reading experience that captures the way in which many teens struggle with mental illness. It is a lesson in acceptance and understanding, and readers will be deeply moved.” - Books+Publishing

Turtles All the Way Down

John Green

“This novel is by far [Green’s] most difficult to read. It’s also his most astonishing. . . . So surprising and moving and true that I became completely unstrung. . . . One needn’t be suffering like Aza to identify with it. One need only be human.” - Jennifer Senior, The New York Times

Wintergirls

Laurie Halse Anderson

“With naked emotion, brutal honesty and a narrative that’s simultaneously captivating and claustrophobic, Wintergirls gives readers a haunting window into the disordered thinking behind eating disorders.” - Norah Piehl, BookPage

Care for the Crag: Call to Actions

Care for the Crag: Call to Actions

Here in Southern California, we are fortunate to have vast lands to explore, state and national parks to hike, camp and climb in, and miles of beaches to surf and swim. The great outdoors offers recreational opportunities that keep our minds fresh, our bodies in shape, and places to create memories with family and friends. 

As part of our Care for the Crag program and in light of Keep American Beautiful Month, we're providing some way to get involved! Keep America Beautiful Month is a reminder of just how precious our outdoor land is, and how necessary it is for each of us to do our part to keep it that way. Sacred Native lands, established climbing areas and biodiverse landscapes are in danger now, more than ever, of facing irreversible destruction. Together, our voices and our actions can help us to save the outdoors and keep America beautiful.

30 BY 30

Patagonia Action Works 

In 2020, only 15 percent of the world’s lands and 8 percent of its waters were protected under some type of designation, such as national parks or ocean sanctuaries. Scientists say that is not enough—extinction looms for more than one million species of plants and animals, and that is bad news for humans, too. To curb the mass extinction crisis and address climate change, scientists and conservationists urge that we protect 30 percent of the world’s lands and waters by 2030.

Join the Journey or Text “THIRTY” to 71333

Protect Pine Mountain 

Los Padres Forest Watch 

The Forest Service plans to expedite logging in the proposed wilderness and across miles of old-growth forest and chaparral, deep in the Ventura County backcountry.

Despite the project’s massive scale, the Forest Service will not conduct a detailed study of potential impacts to the area’s unique ecosystems. Instead, officials announced that they will rely on a controversial loophole to bypass these requirements and limit the public’s ability to voice concerns.

 

The ridge is a remarkable biodiversity hotspot. Pine Mountain has some of the most diverse and unique habitats in the Los Padres National Forest that are home to dozens of rare or sensitive plants as well as animals such as black bears, mountain lions, and bobcats. 

Donate to the Pine Mountain Defense Fund or Ask the Forest Service to Protect Pine Mtn

Recreate Responsibly

Recreate Responsibly Coalition

The Recreate Responsibly Coalition aspires for everyone to have a holistic outdoor experience by advancing all aspects of responsible recreation: keeping yourself, others, and outdoor places safe; accessing outdoor benefits essential to the human experience; and building an outdoors for all through justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion.

Know How to #RecreateResponsibly  or Join the Coalition

Save Oak Flat

Oak Flat is a recreation area within the Tonto National Forest in Arizona. Prized for its hiking, biking, camping, birdwatching, canyoneering, and especially bouldering and rock climbing — with more than 2,500 established climbing routes.

Resolution Copper, a subsidiary of two giant, foreign mining companies seeks to mine copper starting 7,000 feet below the surface Oak Flat. 

In 2014 Congress agreed to transfer Oak Flat into Resolution’s private control, exempting it from federal laws protecting religiously, culturally, anthropologically, and environmentally significant sites.

Sign petition to Protect Oak Flat or Donate to Apache-Stronghold

The Climber's Pact

Access Fund

As climbers, we have a personal stake in the health of our outdoor landscapes—without them, we have no place to climb. But as our sport continues to grow in popularity, we are loving our climbing areas to death. Join us in making a few minor adjustments to your climbing practice that will protect our outdoor landscapes and the climbing experience we love. The future of our sport depends on it.

Commit to The Climber's Pact

RGPro Connect App Guide

RGPro Connect App Guide

What the heck is this RGPro Connect App we keep talking about? We're here to help you navigate through the mobile app that many climbing centers are using for booking climbing reservations, managing your booking, and more. Below you'll find a step-by-step guide with visuals on how to use the RGPro Connect App specifically for Sender One!

Getting Started:

1. Download the RGProConnect App from the App Store or Google Play.

2. Open the app and search for your facility: Sender One SNA or LAX

3. Create an account and log in.
*TIP* The app will sometimes automatically default a specific location. To change locations, click the three lines on the top left-hand corner and select "Facility" to choose the desired location.

4. From the main screen of your chosen facility, select an action:
+ My Recent Online Bookings
+ Book Intro Class
+ Latest Climbs Set

Features:

Check-in Barcode

Members can link their unique member account ID to the app, making check-in easy using your phone. Visit a Customer Experience Specialist at the front desk to get your mobile barcode set up. The Member Barcode can be found on the bottom right-hand corner of the app.

Convenient Bookings

Since we currently require reservations to visit Sender One LAX and SNA, the app provides a quick and simple way to make bookings. Click "Reserve a Session" from your selected location's main page to book.

Easy Cancellation

Can't make a session? Canceling your reservation from the app is hassle-free and opens up those spots for others to book. Click "My Recent Online Bookings" to select which reservation to cancel.

Quick Access to Important Links

We've added some external links that can be conveniently accessed from the app like our Digital Health Screening and requests for changes to your Membership.
Reminder: The Digital Health Screening must be completed no more than 1-hour before your session! The app is a great and quick way to access the health questionnaire.
A diagram showing the phone application and its features with arrows pointing to the features. The features include: easy cancellation, convenient bookings, quick access to links, and a check-in barcode.
Women of Sender One: Part 2

Women of Sender One: Part 2

We are incredibly fortunate to work with a solid group of women who not only align with our core values but are mentors and leaders. To the women of Sender One, the managers, gym staff, and yoga instructors, we are inspired by you -- a unique bunch where some are moms, sisters, artists, runners, aerialists, and even an ex-stunt double. Thank you for your passion, kindness, teamwork, and authenticity!

In this two-part blog series and in light of Women’s History Month, we asked a few questions to some of the women at Sender One. Find out who they look up to, discover recommendations for women-focused books/films/podcasts, and take in some thoughtful advice.

Check out Women of Sender One: Part 1 here.

Meet some of the ladies behind our company roles at Sender One HQ!

Alice Kao

Co-Founder, CEO
w/ Sender One since the beginning, before there was a Sender One.

Women who inspire you:
My aunt Ellie, a polio survivor. The left side of her body is paralyzed but she learned to walk with metal braces and crutches. I lived with her for 4 years when I was in elementary school and every night I would massage her back; she has severe scoliosis from the muscle imbalance.

Her condition didn't stop her from living a full life! She ran a gift shop business for 10 years and had a 2nd career as a tour guide. She's travelled to over 30 countries. In her retirement, she completed her high school and college degree.

I can't wait to visit her in Taiwan when we are able to travel again. My kids will love going on rides with her on her 3-wheeled motorcycle.

Favorite women-focused recommendations
Book:
Dare to Lead by Brene Brown
Advice for women & young girls
Don't be fearless, be courageous.

Being courageous is to put your whole heart into the world and on the line, even knowing what it might cost you.

Being courageous is to have that conversation even if you're afraid of what the other person might say.

Being courageous is to deeply apologize when you make a mistake.

Always choose courage over fear.

Dersa Cyr

Finance Manager
w/ Sender One since 2013

Women who inspire you:
The women on our team. They are all awesome women that strive for growth and improvement. They support each other like no other team I have been a part of. I have learned so much from strong women at Sender One.
Favorite women-focused recommendations
Books:
Girl Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis
anything by Brene Brown
Advice for women & young girls
Be kind to yourself, always. We are our own biggest critique.
Learn to take risks to achieve your greatest goals.
Embrace failure not as a negative but instead as an opportunity to grab hold of a lesson and press on.
Be grateful.

Caitlyn Volkman

Merch. Manager, Buyer
w/ Sender One since 2016

Women who inspire you:
Elizabeth Warren, Ashley Fiolek, Stacey Abrams. The strong, smart, capable, and resilient women I work with every day at Sender One. I've been inspired by each and every one of these women in the years I've worked alongside them.
Favorite women-focused recommendations
Books:
She Persisted by Chelsea Clinton
Sulwe by Lupita Nyong'o
Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly
These books really connected with and inspired my two little girls, and really moved me in turn.

Music:
Muna, Broods, Chvrches, Girl in Red - strong women making music that resonates and empowers me.

Advice for women & young girls
Discover and love your authentic self. Even when it's hard or scary, be true to yourself. Never stop learning. Be humble and teachable when you make mistakes, and then move forward!

Crystal Tan

Brand Marketing Manager
w/ Sender One since 2015

Women who inspire you:
First and foremost - my mom. She's supported all my crazy ideas while giving me wholesome, direct advice. She's never let me down and continues to be the strongest woman in my life. I am also constantly inspired by the women I am surrounded by in climbing and at work. These women are kind, honest, understanding, authentic, all-around badasses, and just truly incredible. I am always learning from them.
Favorite women-focused recommendations
Authors:
Maya Angelou, Rupi Kaur, Roxanne Gay, Angela Davis, Toni Morrison

Podcast:
The Hey, Girl Podcast by Alex Elle and Life Kit by NPR (not all women-focused, but some great, practical tips for life!)

Music:
Nina Simone, Florence and the Machine, Beyonce, Cat Power, Ella Fitzgerald

Advice for women & young girls
Stay present. Celebrate and thank yourself always. There is no "right way" to be a woman. We all have different experiences and that's completely ok. You know best what you are going through. We're all together in this thing called life so it's important to be supportive, kind, to listen, and to always be learning.

Nicole Pate

Director of Gym Operations
w/ Sender One since 2013

Women who inspire you:
I feel lucky to be in a time where there are so many inspiring women to look up to. Since becoming a mom, the women that have inspired me most are other moms. I have friends and family that are working moms (some Sender One moms too!) and stay-at-home moms, and without all of their advice and support, I think my first year and a half as a parent would have been impossible. They have helped me become and be an amazing mom to my daughter while keeping my identity as a climber, leader, friend, yogi, artist, etc. Also, Serena winning the Australian Open while pregnant was a huge inspiration for me to keep climbing while pregnant and to start back up postpartum.
Favorite women-focused recommendations
I love ESPN's 30 for 30 documentary and podcast series. They are not all women-focused, but there are some really inspiring women-focused episodes --"On The Ice", "Back Pass", and "Six Who Sat"
Advice for women & young girls
Be kind to yourself and others. Support and lift up those around you. If you want to see change, don't wait for someone else to do it, you make it happen.

Nicola Strother

Director of Yoga & Fitness
w/ Sender One since 2012

Women who inspire you:
My mom (just because she is amazing), my dad (Kate) who is transgender. Kate lived the first 70 years of her life in the "wrong body" and was expected to live up to certain stereotypes. She is now living her life to the fullest in New Zealand as the person she was meant to be. Defying any gender roles, redefining life, and breaking boundaries. My co-workers because they lift me up and support me in being learning to be the best that I can.
Favorite women-focused recommendations
Books:
West with the Night by Beryl Markham
Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
Advice for women & young girls
Be you! Let the small things go. You live once, so live it to the fullest.

Women of Sender One: Part 1

Women of Sender One: Part 1

We are incredibly fortunate to work with a solid group of women who not only align with our core values but are mentors and leaders. To the women of Sender One, the managers, gym staff, and yoga instructors, we are inspired by you -- a unique bunch where some are moms, sisters, artists, runners, aerialists, and even an ex-stunt double. Thank you for your passion, kindness, teamwork, and authenticity!

In this two-part blog series and in light of Women’s History Month, we asked a few questions to some of the women at Sender One. Find out who they look up to, discover recommendations for women-focused books/films/podcasts, and take in some thoughtful advice.

Check out Women of Sender One: Part 2 here.

Now, here are some of our wonderful ladies from Sender One SNA and LAX!

Jordan Terry

LAX Gym Manager
w/ Sender One since 2016

Women who inspire you:
There are some spectacular well-known women who inspire me (RBG, AOC, Georgia O'Keefe, Frida) but honestly, I draw most of my inspiration from the amazing women I spend my day-to-day with. Since I started at Sender One I've been truly uplifted by the women in leadership at this company. It would be a dream if someone told me I was a little bit like Alice, a little bit like Nicole, Morgan, Crystal, Michelle & so on. The woman I want to be is one that draws from the strengths (& weaknesses) of these truly incredible women I have the honor to work with. They are the best teachers & partners I could have ever asked for. Also, my daughter is my reason for everything.
Favorite women-focused recommendations

Books:
The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery
Anything Barbara Kingsolver or Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Music:
Beyonce, Jessie Ware & Lianne La Havas when you need a musical boost

Advice for women & young girls
It's okay to be your totally weird authentic self. It's what makes you special (even when it also makes you cringe). Own who you are, keep your heart open to growing, value yourself highly, and advocate for yourself always. You are perfect!

Morgan Sander

SNA Gym Manager
w/ Sender One since 2015

Women who inspire you:
I am surrounded by amazing women who exemplify what it means to follow your passions through your career - in particular, my mom and my sister, my students, and the team of incredible women I get to work with daily. As leaders in education, sports, and the outdoor and climbing industry, their drive, compassion, and grit lead them to accomplish whatever they set out for.
Favorite women-focused recommendations
The Artist Athlete Podcast
Advice for women & young girls
If you try to follow someone else's path through life, it's like trying to force a puzzle piece into space where it doesn't quite fit. Step off someone's else path and embrace what makes you, YOU. Your path is yours.

Michelle Mitchell

LAX Programs Manager
w/ Sender One since 2017

Women who inspire you:
I'm inspired by all female athletes, whether they're weekend warriors or professionals. Here are a few of the women that I constantly look up to Mia Hamm and pretty much the entire US women’s soccer team. Serena Williams. Courtney Dauwalter. Allyson Felix. Alexi Pappas. Beth Rodden. All of these women continue to demonstrate leadership, grace, humility, and commitment in and out of their sport. They inspire me daily to carry myself in a similar manner in hopes of passing these values on to the next generation of athletes.
Favorite women-focused recommendations

Books:
The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett
Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb
Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo
Bravey by Alexi Pappas

Advice for women & young girls
You are capable of more than you think. You can be on the field, court, wall, and track; you can be in the research lab and on the leadership team. You can do it. Don't let others set limitations for you. You’re not too small. You’re not too weak. You’re not unladylike. Dream big, work hard, be nice to people. Make it count.

Laurel Melton

SNA Youth Program
Coordinator
w/ Sender One since 2019

Women who inspire you:

I'm inspired by all the incredible young women that I coach. I get to see them show up to practice every day and work hard to achieve their goals and break through their physical and mental barriers. I am so proud of the supportive and encouraging team environment that they help create.

Favorite women-focused recommendations

Books:
Climbing Free by Lynn Hill
What Kind of Woman by Kate Baer

Podcast:
Masterbeta Ladies Podcast

Advice for women & young girls

Never let anyone tell you that you don't belong in this sport. Appreciate your body and recognize its strengths; your climbing style will likely be different than that of your male peers, but that is not a bad thing! Use those differences to your advantage and develop the more technical side of your climbing--I think you'll be surprised by what you can accomplish.

Alisha Vasquez

SNA Youth Coach, Yoga & Climbing Instructor
w/ Sender One since 2015

Women who inspire you:
I'm inspired by all the super-strong female crushers in our sport who are continuously proving that women can climb as hard as men. I'm also inspired by female athletes of every sport who challenge the stereotypes, expectations, and limitations placed on women.
Favorite women-focused recommendations

Book:
Climbing Free by Lynn Hill

Song:
Free Woman by Lady Gaga

Film:
Pretty Strong

Advice for women & young girls
It takes hard work to overcome the stories that have been ingrained in us about how women should look, think, and act. It's an ongoing process to unlearn all the "shoulds," but it's important work because becoming your authentic self is invaluable.

Anni Nguyen

SNA CX Specialist, Youth Coach, Community Coord.
w/ Sender One since 2015

Women who inspire you:
I am so fortunate to be surrounded by strong, inspiring, and loving women. They include my mother, my sister, my coworkers, and my friends. They have inspired me to show up in life, for myself and for others. I have been given such love and support throughout many changing phases of my life. They show up and I am so blessed to be loved by them. There are too many awesome women to count that have touched me. You know who you are and I'm grateful for you.
Favorite women-focused recommendations

Books:
Untamed by Glennon Doyle and Girl
Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis

Song:
I Choose You by Alessia Clare
Sorry, Not Sorry by Demi Lovato

Films:
Penelope with Christina Ricci
Amelie with Audrey Tautou

Advice for women & young girls
Be you and show up.
Plan your work and work your plan.
Don't "should" all over yourself.
Love greatly and always be kind.

Devan Roper

SNA CX Specialist, Youth Coach
w/ Sender One since 2019

Women who inspire you:
I am inspired by my Mom who fought through stage three colon cancer a couple of years ago. She has had multiple surgeries that changed her body a lot but she has stayed grateful and loving through it all. I hope to be that strong someday.
Favorite women-focused recommendations

Film:
Pretty Strong

Podcast:
TrainingBeta

Advice for women & young girls

My advice would be to slow down and appreciate what you have in the present. There is always a little bit of good to be found, when I am feeling really beat up from the world I try to take a step back and just look at what I have and say "this is enough."

Pin It on Pinterest